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Increasing Your Brand Awareness Is Good Farm Marketing

Make A Stencil: Increasing Your Brand Awareness Is Good Farm Marketing

Article by John Suscovich from Farm Marketing Solutions

Your farm is your brand, and your brand is your farm. It is always good practice to increase your brand awareness. This is particularly true when you are starting a farm.

On my farm and off I am always putting my farm name anywhere I can. I leave business cards at cafes and book stores, I leave pamphlets at doctor’s offices, and I have shirts with my farm name on them that I wear anywhere I go. After all, I want my business to be a success, and in order for it to become a success more people have to know about it.

With visitors coming every week to my farm I wanted a way for my farm name to get into the pictures that they take, and for it to get into the pictures that I take and put online. A simple solution for me was to create a cardboard stencil so I can “tag” all of my stuff and increase brand awareness.

The process was very simple, and I will have the stencil as long as I can keep it in one piece. Here’s what I did:

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I chose a simple font and printed out the letters to my farm name in a very large font size. Obviously the whole name will not fit on one sheet so you will have to print out several sheets.

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Next I lined up all the letters and taped them onto a piece of cardboard. I actually doubled up on the cardboard and cut out two stencils at once. Always good to have a back-up.

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Choose a simple font that will be easy to read. It will also make it easier to cut out. I used Arial for this.

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Put it everywhere. I have it on my chicken tractors, my farm trailer, and I’ll even put it on my Vermont Cart. Just make sure the stencil doesn’t move when you are painting or it will look funny. Here I held it with bricks. I have also used a t-50 stapler to hold it while I spray.

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You can see my stencil on the end of my chicken tractor that I brought to an Earth Day event.

Return on Investment

My farm name is increasingly in my pictures that get shared all over the internet. Since it is clear that I take my business seriously and I want to be a success, others want to see me succeed as well. That leads to an increase of CSA members (4 since the event a couple days ago), and a bolstering of the community around my farm.


What can you be doing to increase brand awareness for you farm?

Link Photo courtesy of Farm Marketing Solutions

Article courtesy of Farm Marketing Solutions

For more information on how to brand your farm business check out a video by Ernest Barbaric on creating your brand online.

 

Breaking Down the Cost of Production on Your Farm Operation

Kent Plosz teaches us how to calculate the cost of production on your farm operation.

The number one thing that farmers really need to consider is the cost of production. If you don’t know your cost of production, how can you answer fundamental questions about your farming operation?

Do you really know the cost of production on your farm operation?You have to know if your farming business is making money, or how can you continue to farm? If you’re not making any money from farming, this is a very important thing to know because there could be things you could change to ensure you do make money as a farmer.

This workshop was funded in part by the Agriculture & Food Council of Alberta

 

 

Relationships in the Value Chain

Brenda Schoepp explains that to get a clear understanding of each of levels of the value chain, visit each of the sectors near you. Start to build relationships with the sectors and use those relationships as a foundation for expanding your cattle industry.

 

 

Q&A: Building Relationships 

 

Feed Testing is a No Brainer

Have you had your feed tested this winter?

Article courtesy of Beef Cattle Research Council

While feed testing seems like a “no brainer”, it is surprising how many cattlemen skip this critical management tool. It seems many would rather rely on visual appraisal (i.e. colour, plant species, and leaf content) or knowledge of cutting time to judge quality. While these are all indicators of forage quality, they do not substitute for a feed test particularly when it comes to the energy and protein content of that forage. For example, the protein content of brome hay can range from as low as 5 to 6% up to 18% depending on stage of maturity at cutting. While visual appraisal may help separate the good from the poor quality hay, it is not going to help you decide how much protein supplement, if any, you need to background calves when feeding this hay. Only a feed test can accurately help you make this decision.

~  John McKinnon, Ph.D. at the University of Saskatchewan

Read more about the importance of having your feed tested and related resources.