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5 Things Every Producer Needs To Know Before Selling Cattle Online

Marketing cattle online is becoming the next big thing in our industry, but with so many gadgets, services and technology available today it can be overwhelming where to even begin. So we talked to David Moss, co-founder of Agriclear, to help us hack into what buyers are actually looking for when purchasing your cattle online, and how to get yourself ready for successfully selling online.  Agriclear is a new platform for producers to securely purchase and sell cattle online, and we think it’s pretty cool because it’s one of the first platforms that has truly simplified the process and made it safe and secure for both buyer and seller, by adding a payment assurance backstop to every transaction. Agriclear is backed by the TMX Group (owners of the TSX among other companies), and this gives producers across North America that sense of security and peace of mind when marketing online.  Here are David’s top 5 tips that every cattle producer needs to know to help increase sales online.

 

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1.      High Quality Media Sells – take several high definition (HD) pictures from several angles and ensure the photos are representative of the entire lot being sold.  Take several short (10-30 second) HD videos of your cattle, and ensure the environment they are in (i.e. on grass or in a feedlot) is clearly shown in the media materials. Click here to learn how to take better photos with your iPhone.

 

Pupils you betray me

2.      Describe Your Cattle Accurately – ensure you accurately describe your cattle, including animal type and kind, condition (green, medium, fleshy), vaccination program, implant program, and current feeding program.  You want to ensure your description matches what buyers are seeing in the pictures and videos you have provided.  If you are describing your cattle as green, and yet the videos clearly show fleshy cattle, buyers will have concerns.  You want the reputation of always being fair and accurate in your description.  This includes fully disclosing any poor doers, late calvers, or “neighbours bull” events!

 

cattle scale

3.      Know Your Weights!! – this is absolutely critical!  Take representative test weights often.  Do not rely on last year’s results to predict this year’s weights.  Cattle that do not hit the sale weight is a big issue for buyers.  A missed in-weight will often result in their inability to hit specific finished target markets, and will “weigh heavily” on your online reputation.

 

consolidated sale lot

4.      Package and Prepare Your Sale Lot – where possible, package your selling lot(s) into uniform groups of cattle, including colour (breed), weights, sex, animal type, and program.  Sort off any sick or compromised cattle.  Take the perspective of a buyer.  Build sale lots that you would want to buy, avoid trying to “hide” off-type cattle in your sale lots.  Check out this great video with Brenda Schoepp on how to consolidate your cattle.

 

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5.      Be Flexible – listing and selling online is a relatively new phenomenon.  You will need to be flexible and fair with your counterparty to the transaction.  Shipping dates may need to adjust, cattle may get sick prior to the agreed to delivery date, your buyer may need a couple more days to clear pen space for your cattle, or weather may play a role in when both parties can complete the transaction.  Communicate openly and often with your buyer, build that trust, and demonstrate your integrity.  Creating an online market place takes patience and commitment from all parties.  Doing your part in making the online experience a positive one.  Selling online is truly a win-win opportunity for both the seller and the buyer, be a positive participant of this transformation in cattle marketing.

The Fast Farmer: Grazing

Grazing management is an incredibly powerful way to increase the profitability of your farm business. In fact, a study using data from the AgriProfit Business Analysis & Research Program compared the profit per acre of growing grass to the profit of growing spring wheat, barley and canola, and grazing had the highest profit per acre every single time, over a 10 year period. As a bonus, grazing management also offers your farm the following benefits:

• Improving the land’s ability to withstand drought
• Reduction of soil erosion
• Promotion of biodiversity
• Enhancement of water quality and quantity
• Production of healthy food products
• Providing habitat for wildlife and insects that pollinate crops
• Assistance in carbon sequestration, mitigating climate change

However, it’s also a tool that can be intimidating to learn about if you’re new to it. If you’re like us, you’ve probably seen and heard just enough about grazing that you’re intimidated to give it a try and unsure where to start.
Working with the Alberta Forages Industry Network, we designed this series of workshops specifically to give you only the critical starting steps you’ll need to create a basic plan and install a simple fencing and water system. It will also walk you through the 4 essential principles of grazing and give powerful examples of how those principles have been used by successful producers in various climates, ranging from large operations to very small farms starting from scratch.
This page is set up so that you can go through the series in a linear flow from top to bottom, or you can jump ahead and click on any of the workshop links that interest you. As this grazing series is the initial “pilot” of FarmOn’s new Fast Farmer program, we would love to know what you think of the content and this format of learning. You can get in touch with Sarah or Ben any time to let us know what you think, or send an email to info@farmon.com

 

Grazing Stories

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We’ve found that there’s something people have in common who are good at rotational grazing. They have a huge passion for growing grass, caring for livestock, restoring land and soil, protecting water and habitats, and finding innovative ways to produce a healthy profit. And we thought the best way to get that across was with a few short videos. Click the photo above to check them out.

 

The Four Principles of Grazing
There are 4 basic principles that apply to all successful grazing operations, regardless of location, size or climate. They work in South Africa and they work in northern Alberta. This workshop will explain what each of the 4 principles are, and how you can get started in implementing them in your operation.

The 4 Principles of Grazing Management

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The 4 Principles of Grazing are:
1) Overgrazing – What is it and how can you tell if you’re doing it?
2) Rest – What is it and how can you tell when your pasture has had enough rest?
3) Stocking Density – How can you tell if you’re stocking density is too heavy or too light?
4) Monitoring – How to track changes in your pasture and its productivity.

 

Planning

The best place to set up your grazing system isn’t anywhere on your pasture, it’s in your office. Do yourself a massive favour and before you go setting anything up, spend a bit of time planning it out. Are you going to use permanent cross fencing or portable wire? How are you getting water out to each area of your pasture? What’s the best route to get animals back to a processing location for treating a sick animal? Are there riparian or wooded areas that you’ll need to fence off or graze differently? Figuring it out ahead of time on paper, as much as possible, will save you time, money, and headaches.
The following two workshops will walk you through a simple process to get some of the basic elements of a grazing system down on paper. We’ve created one for designing a plan using portable cross fencing, and one using permanent cross fencing with an alley system. Feel free to check them both out and see which one is the best fit for your operation.

How To Design a Grazing Plan Using Portable Cross Fencing

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How To Design a Grazing Plan Using an Alley System

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With either of the above systems, a good plan always starts with getting a good aerial or satellite view of your land. If you don’t have one yet and aren’t familiar with using Google Earth, check out How To Print a Satellite Photo of Your Farm from Google Earth

 

Fencing

Grazing is nothing new, in fact farmers have been grazing cattle since the beginning of the agricultural revolution thousands of years ago. But “intensive grazing management” is relatively new. By using lectric fencing you can control stocking density on your pasture by setting up small paddocks, at a low cost. Without electric fence it just wouldn’t be feasible or economical.
We recommend setting up a permanent perimeter fence, which is actually pretty easy to do if you already have an existing barbed wire fence, by using offset insulators and high tensile wire. This workshop lays out the steps, tools and materials needed to get it done.

Installing Permanent Electric Fence

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How To Set Up Portable Electric Fence

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How To Brace a Corner Fence Post, Underground

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How To Splice High Tensile Fencing Wire

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If you’re fairly new to using electric fencing, here’s a great fact sheet that outlines how it works, with some useful tips and important safety considerations.

 

Water Systems

I think every grazer would agree that the ideal watering system is the one that requires the least amount of maintenance, and has the least number of things that can fail. We came across some brilliant ideas from some of the best grazers around, and the workshops below will walk you through how to set up something similar for your own operation.

How To Set Up a Gravity Feed Watering System

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How To Set Up a Pasture Pipeline Watering System

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Case Studies

We’ve spoken to several of the most successful grazers in Alberta, and it’s amazing how different their backgrounds are, as well as their experiences and even the types of business models they use to create profitable operations. We picked a few of their stories and created these 3 powerful case studies for you to learn from. We take a look at how each of them got started in grazing, how they adapted the 4 Priciples of Grazing, and how they turned it into a successful business.

Key points:
• Be adaptable/flexible: in land, in resources and in your mindset
• Anyone can develop a profitable grazing enterprise
• Simple, yet planned changes result in big results both for the land and for your business
• Looking after the land – will look after your profits
• Anyone can start today with small steps

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Further Resources

If you have any questions about the Fast Farmer Grazing Edition we would love to hear from you. You can Tweet us a comment or question to @FarmOn with the hash tag #FastFarmer, or email us directly at sarah.wray@farmon.com. Below are a few extra resources that we also thought you might find useful. Good luck!

Here’s a great Podcast from Permaculture Voices, interviewing a successful rancher in California who uses rotational grazing.

ForageBeef.ca offers a lot of information and fact sheets on everything from cow/calf economics to feed testing and drought management.

Thank You
The Fast Farmer: Grazing Series is the result of a lot of great people, experienced grazers and innovative farmers providing FarmOn with information and connecting us with great resources. We’d like to thank the Alberta Forages Industry Network, the Grey Wooded Forage Association, and the Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency in particular, for their amazing support.

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Grazing Stories

Iain Aitken’s Story 

Iain Aitken grew up on an 8th generation cattle ranch in Scotland.  When he picked up everything and moved to Canada he was determined to learn everything he could about rotational grazing from some of the best producers in the area, and how to transfer his existing skills and knowledge from Scotland to the vastly different climate in central Alberta.

 

Don Ruzicka’s Story 

Don shares his story about transitioning from a conventional commodity operation to a grass based system, using intensive grazing management and holistic management principles.

 

Kristie and Brent Vallet’s Story

Kristie and Brent never planned to be goat farmers, but once their children reached the age where they wanted to become more involved in the operation they did some market research and found that their land and their family were a perfect fit for a grazing operation.  They started out small, and have learned a lot along the way.

 

The Fast Farmer – Grazing Edition

The Fast Farmer is all about giving you the hands on steps necessary to get started and experience some quick wins in your business.  If you’re interested in tapping into the profit that rotational grazing can add to your operation, check out The Fast Farmer – Grazing Edition.

 

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Other Stories

Blain Hjertaas farms near Redvers, Saskatchewan, and wrote this article for the Western Producer:  Healthy Soil Makes For Healthy Humans.

Holistic Management International has written some helpful book reviews for anyone interested in grazing management – check them out here.

 

The 4 Principles of Grazing Management

No matter where you live, and no matter what condition your land is in, the basics of grazing management always come down to these four essential principles.  Follow them, and you can dramatically improve the health and productivity of your pasture.  All of the principles are interlinked, and each of them involve various practical skills that you’ll have to develop through experience, trial and error, and from talking to other grazers.  There are some great links below to other workshops that will give you the practical how-to steps of setting up a grazing plan and getting started with fencing and water systems.  For now, please take a few minutes to wrap your head around the basic principles that every successful grazing system is built on!

Principle #1- Rest

Giving pasture adequate rest is crucial.  Learning how to guage the right amount of rest time can be tricky though, because it’s not as simple as just giving each paddock a set number of days before grazing it again.  The rest time between grazing will vary depending on a lot of factors that change throughout the season, as well as from one season to the next.  The best way to tell if the grass has had adequate rest is by walking out and checking the plants’ stage of growth.  Is the grass just starting to regrow?  Is it over mature and already seeding out?  When the grass has had plenty of leafy growth and starting to form reproductive heads, then you know it’s ready to be grazed again.

Here are a few of the variables that determine how long the rest period will need to be before a paddock is ready to be grazed again.

  • How severely was it grazed? (this affects how much of the grass’ roots were lost and how fast the plants will recover)
  • Climate – How wet or dry is it?  How hot is it?
  • Plant Species – Some forages regrow much more rapidly than others.

 

Principle #2- Over Grazing 

The principle of over-grazing sounds simple, but it’s easy to get “over-grazing” mixed up with “severe grazing”.  Over grazing simply means that the grass has been grazed, and then re-grazed AGAIN before the plants have fully recovered from the first grazing.  This can happen in two ways.  1) Animals are left in a paddock too long and they begin to re-graze some of the same plants a second time before being moved off that paddock.  And 2) Animals are brought back to a paddock too soon and plants are grazed before they’ve fully recovered from the last time the paddock was grazed.

As long as grass is given a long enough rest period, it can be grazed severely without being considered “over-grazed”.

 

Overgrazing diagram
If your animals have been grazing in a paddock long enough for that grass to start to re-grow and you see new growth being eaten, you are over-grazing that paddock and need to get the animals moved to the next paddock.

 

Principle #3- Stocking Density

Stocking Density and Stocking Rate are closely related terms but they’re not the same thing.  Stocking Rate is the number of livestock grazing the whole pasture.  So if you have a quarter section of 160 acres, with 320 head of cattle, that means the stocking rate is 2 head per acre.  Stocking Density is the number of animals grazing a single paddock at one time.  So if your herd of 320 cattle are confined to a paddock that is 10 acres in size, that works out to 32 head per acre.  If the next paddock is only 3.2 acres in size, that would be a stocking density of 100 head per acre.

 

Principle #4- Monitoring

Here are some specific things to monitor that will tell you a lot about the health of your pasture:

  • Regrowth – How quickly are the plants recovering and going through their productive cycle?  You don’t want to come back to a paddock too early and end up over-grazing it, but also don’t want to wait too long and end up with grass that has lost nutritional value by over-maturing.
  • Manure – You know your pasture is in good health when manure shoots out about 6 ft and spreads out on the ground.  If it’s too runny, likely your pasture is lacking fibre.  And if it lands in a pile and doesn’t spread out, likely your pasture has too much fibre and dead material.
  • Bare ground –  If the amount of bare ground on your pasture is starting to increase, something is definitely not working.  Most likely it’s a sign of over-grazing.
  • Weeds – If weeds such as thistles, yarrow, prairie sage or wild strawberry start to appear or their size/numbers start increasing, it’s a sure sign that the health of the pasture is in decline and something needs to change, like increasing rest duration.
  • Trends – By taking photos in the same locations each year you can start to see trends forming.  Tracking the increase or decrease of particular grass species, legumes or invasive weeds over time can be very helpful with planning.

 

 Further Resources

  1. Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development has produced a helpful Range Health Assessment tool that walks you through several questions and scores the health of your pasture.
  2. Beef Cattle Research Council has some great information about rangeland health assessment, how to improve and maintain the health of riparian areas, and some resources around establishing or rejuvenating stands of forage crops.

 

How to Design a Grazing Plan Using an Alley System

jim_profile_pic

Credit: The following method was developed from an interview with Jim Stone.  Jim has spent 35 years as a journeyman mechanic and welder, but he’s always been a cattleman at heart.  He studied agriculture at Olds College, honed his welding and heavy duty mechanic trades at SAIT, and even returned to Olds as a trades instructor, but always wanted to run cattle and eventually purchased a quarter section to pursue his dream.

After attending a Rotational Pasture Management School, Jim started practicing sustainable grazing management in order to get the most production he could from a small land  base, while still sustaining the land and other resources.

 

About Project 

After spending three years hauling fence post, untangling wire and running a maze of hoses from our barns to the field without a proper grazing system in place, there comes a time when moving cows under the moonlight isn’t nearly as romantic as it sounds.  But our biggest challenge was knowing where and how to start.  The good news is we talked with some of the mavericks of grazing systems, and now have a bulletproof method anyone can follow, to quickly get a solid plan in place.

This project will help you create a plan for a simple grazing system with a permanent, single strand electric perimeter fence, permanent single strand cross fencing, and a single strand alley system.

 

Materials and Tools 

  • 8 1/2”x11” Overhead Projector Sheets
  • Permanent Marker (two colors)
  • Red, Green, Blue and Black Dry Erase Markers
  • Aerial Photo Expanded to 6-8 inches squared for quarter of land.
    (You can find these at Fertilizer Dealers, Department of Ag or Google Earth)
  • Graph paper
  • Calculator
  • Access to a Photocopier

 

Step 1  – Print or Photocopy an Aerial Photo of your land

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If you already have an aerial photo of your land, try to enlarge it on a photocopier to fill as much of the page as possible.  If you don’t have an aerial or satellite photo, you can usually find one at your local Fertilizer Dealer, Department of Ag or using Google Earth.Click here for a tutorial on how to print a satellite photo from Google Earth.

 

Step 2 – Draw perimeter fence onto a sheet of transparency film

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Place a sheet of 8.5 x 11 transparency film over your aerial photo.  Using a permanent marker, draw in the perimeter fence line. (Note: Your perimeter fence will always be energized, making it super easy to energize your cross fencing.)

rsz_aerial_photo_310x206

Next, take a different colour of permanent marker to draw in all the objects that will not change, such as sloughs, creeks, dugouts, trees or special areas.   These areas may still be grazed but require special management(Click here for further information on this topic from Cows and Fish).  For instance, a wet area may need to wait until later in the fall to be grazed.

 

Step 3 – Set up a grid to measure areas of land

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Place your transparency sheet with the perimeter fence marked on it, on top of a sheet of graph paper.  (Click here to download free graph paper).  Count how many squares of the graph paper are within your property line of your quarter section.  In this case, the quarter section is 22 squares by 22 squares.  Once you’ve counted up the squares inside the quarter section, simply divide the number of acres of land on the map by the number of squares you counted.  So in this case, 160 acres divided by 484 squares = 0.33 acres per square.

22 x 22 = 484 squares

Total Area = 160 acres

One Square = 160 acres divided by 484 squares

One Square = 0.33 acres
Now you know how much land is in each square on the graph paper, and you can use that number to figure out the size of each paddock you draw on the map.  All you do is count how many squares are in a paddock, and multiply that by the number you calculated (eg. 0.33 ) to see how many acres are in the paddock.

 

Step 4 – Plan your paddock sizes 

Calculate how much area you will need in each paddock, given the number of cattle you want to graze and how often you want to move your cattle.  Remember that as your grass improves, you can continue to add more animals per paddock to maintain the same number of days before you rotate.  If you are new to the area you can always ask your neighbours about stocking density, or click here to learn more about calculating AUMs.

If you don’t understand AUMs or don’t have a baseline for how many cattle your land can hold, we strongly recommend using portable cross fencing for at least the first year, (using the 3 wire rotation method).

 

Step 5 –  Draw in the paddocks and alleys   

Using dry erase markers, start to draw in paddocks.  Look for areas of equal productivity.  For instance the face of the hills may need more acres of land to hold the cattle on for the same amount of time as the flat land.  Paddock sizes do not have to all be square, random shapes will need to be used in case of wetlands, along creeks and for other unusual land shapes.  Mark all cross fences and single wired fences in the same color.

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Alleys help you connect all paddocks and should provide access back to a homestead or location where you can treat a sick animal.  For a typical quarter section, it works well to have one straight alley down the middle of the quarter, with paddocks on both sides of the alley.

Tip: Choose a dry area, keep the alleys on high ground.

By building your gates the same width as your alleys, you can limit cattle access to only parts of the alley where they need to travel, resulting in very little damage from animal traffic.

Tip:  A good rule of thumb is that for 50 cows, the average alley should be 10 meters wide.  For every additional 50 cows, three meters in width should be added.  Also consider the size of machinery you will want to be taking in.

 

Step 6 – Mark watering sites and/or water lines 

Mark your water lines or sources in blue.  When locating a watering site, the ground must be solid.  It costs too much to make a muddy hole stable.

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If  good water sources and pressure system is available, a pipeline is probably best for suplying a water trough.  To check out other water systems click here.

 

Step 7 – Mark the location of gates 

Choose locations for your gates.  Gates should be on all four corners of where the paddocks meet.  Gate size should be equal to alley width which will allow you to close off the alley when necessary.

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Gate location has a lot to do with cow’s sense. For instance, which way cows will want to go to water.  If you have a square paddock adjoining an alley, you will need a gate in both corners of the paddock to allow cows to get in and out in both directions.  Cows will stand in a corner for days rather than go around and come back up an alley to get water or go to the next paddock.

More gates is more convenient than fewer when moving cattle.

 

Finishing Instructions

Plans are a work in progress. You can change and adapt them easily as you need to.  Once you have your plans remember to check out our fencing and water DIY workshops to see how to most effectively and cheaply install your new system.

 

 

How to Design a Grazing Plan Using Portable Cross Fencing

jim_profile_pic (1)

Credit: The following method was developed from an interview with Jim Stone.  Jim has spent 35 years as a journeyman mechanic and welder, but he’s always been a cattleman at heart.  He studied agriculture at Olds College, honed his welding and heavy duty mechanic trades at SAIT, and even returned to Olds as a trades instructor, but always wanted to run cattle and eventually purchased a quarter section to pursue his dream.

After attending a Rotational Pasture Management School, Jim started practicing sustainable grazing management in order to get the most production he could from a small land  base, while still sustaining the land and other resources.


About Project 

After spending three years hauling fence post, untangling wire and running a maze of hoses from our barns to the field without a proper grazing system in place, there comes a time when moving cows under the moonlight isn’t nearly as romantic as it sounds.  But our biggest challenge was knowing where and how to start.  The good news is we talked with some of the mavericks of grazing systems, and now have a bulletproof method anyone can follow, to quickly get a solid plan in place.

This project will help you create a plan for a simple grazing system with a permanent, single strand electric perimeter fence, and portable cross fencing.

 

Materials and Tools 

  • 8 1/2”x11” Overhead Projector Sheets
  • Permanent Marker (two colors)
  • Red, Green, Blue and Black Dry Erase Markers
  • Aerial Photo Expanded to 6-8 inches squared for quarter of land.
    (You can find these at Fertilizer Dealers, Department of Ag or Google Earth)
  • Graph paper
  • Calculator
  • Access to a Photocopier

 

Step 1  – Print or Photocopy an Aerial Photo of your land

rsz_aerial_photo_step_1_310x208 (1)

If you already have an aerial photo of your land, try to enlarge it on a photocopier to fill as much of the page as possible.  If you don’t have an aerial or satellite photo, you can usually find one at your local Fertilizer Dealer, Department of Ag or using Google Earth.Click here for a tutorial on how to print a picture from Google Earth.

 

Step 2 – Draw perimeter fence onto a sheet of transparency film

rsz_aerial_photo_step_2_310x206 (1)

Place a sheet of 8.5 x 11 transparency film over your aerial photo.  Using a permanent marker, draw in the perimeter fence line. (Note: Your perimeter fence will always be energized, making it super easy to energize your cross fencing.)

rsz_aerial_photo_310x206 (1)

Next, take a different colour of permanent marker to draw in all the objects that will not change, such as sloughs, creeks, dugouts, trees or special areas.   These areas may still be grazed but require special management (Click here for further information on this topic from Cows and Fish).  For instance, a wet area may need to wait until later in the fall to be grazed.

 

Step 3 – Set up a grid to measure areas of land
rsz_aerial_photo_step_4_310x206 (1)

Place your transparency sheet with the perimeter fence marked on it, on top of a sheet of graph paper.  (Click here to download free graph paper).  Count how many squares of the graph paper are within your property line of your quarter section.  In this case, the quarter section is 22 squares by 22 squares.  Once you’ve counted up the squares inside the quarter section, simply divide the number of acres of land on the map by the number of squares you counted.  So in this case, 160 acres divided by 484 squares = 0.33 acres per square.

22 x 22 = 484 squares

Total Area = 160 acres

One Square = 160 acres divided by 484 squares

One Square = 0.33 acres
Now you know how much land is in each square on the graph paper, and you can use that number to figure out the size of each paddock you draw on the map.  All you do is count how many squares are in a paddock, and multiply that by the number you calculated (eg. 0.33 ) to see how many acres are in the paddock.

 

Step 4 – Draw Single Permanent Cross Fence and Gates

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Draw in a single strand cross fence to divide your pasture into two haves.  For example, if you have a 160 acre quarter section you would draw a single cross fence down the middle, creating two 80 acre parcels.  Also mark the locations of gates along this cross fence, likely one at each end.

 

Step 5 – Mark watering sites and/or water lines 

Mark your water lines or sources in blue.  When locating a watering site, the ground must be solid.  It costs too much to make a muddy hole stable.

rsz_aerial_photo_step_6b__with_water__310x206

If good water sources and pressure system is available, a pipeline is probably best for suplying a water trough.

 

Step 6 – Plan your paddock sizes 

Estimate how much area you will need in each paddock, given the number of cattle you want to graze and how often you want to move your cattle.  Remember that as your grass improves, you can continue to add more animals per paddock to maintain the same number of days before you rotate.  If you are new to the area you can always ask your neighbours about stocking density, or click here to learn more about calculating AUMs.

The beautiful thing about portable cross fencing is that you don’t have to calculate exactly how many pounds of forage per acre your pasture is producing.  Instead, you can guess and test, and then adjust the size of your paddock the very next time you move cattle.

The simplest method we’ve come across using portable cross fencing, is the three wire method, illustrated here.

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While your cattle are grazing between fences A and B, a third portable fence C is already set up and energized.  When it’s time to move cattle, all you do is open fence B to let them into the next paddock between B and C.  Once they’re all moved across, just close fence B and simply move fence A to be in front of fence C, ready for the next move.

 

 

Matthew Gould’s Farm Story

When Matthew Gould was young he always knew he wanted to be a farmer. In fact, he made this known to his family from an early age saying that when he was older he would be farming with his Dad. He comes from afarm family, through and through, and all of his siblings have been involved with the farm from a young age.

His familiar, but unique farm story is well worth a watch, if not two! So please, feel free to hit play on the video below and learn about the young farmer, Matthew Gould.


Matthew Gould’s Farm Story

What to Look for in a Feedlot

Building a relationship with the right feedlot can make a huge difference to the profitability of your cattle operation.

 

 

Q&A Producing for a Feedlot 

Why Own a Scale?

Brenda Schoepp explains the importance of owning your own scale for marketing your cattle.

 

 

Weaning Calves

In this video Brenda Schoepp gives strategies to successfully wean your calves.

To reduce the amount of stress on the cattle during the weaning process, pre-expose the cattle to the area that they will be weaned. Make sure there is enough space for the cattle and place a surrogate such as dry cows or lead steers into the pen so the calves have a sense of security. Make sure all  movements are slow and quiet to reduce stress on cattle.

 

 

Q&A Why Wean for 30 days